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Melanoma, FISH, Tissue [A Test in Focus]

Melanocytic tumors arising in the skin can present a significant diagnostic challenge. While many lesions can be easily classified as benign nevi or malignant melanoma based on histologic features alone, there is a significant subset of lesions that cannot be clearly defined as either benign or malignant. Because the course of treatment for malignant melanoma relative to benign lesions varies significantly from the time of diagnosis, accuracy, and expediency of the diagnosis are of paramount importance.

A (FISH)-based test panel has been developed as a diagnostic aid in the differentiation of malignant from benign melanocytic lesions. This test is intended to be used in conjunction with clinical and pathologic information to aid the pathologist in the differentiation of benign from malignant melanocytic lesions.

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  • This test is intended to be used in conjunction with clinical and pathologic information to aid the pathologist in the differentiation of benign from malignant melanocytic lesions.
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  • Tissue — Provide a pathology report with each tissue specimen. The laboratory will not reject a specimen that arrives without this information but will hold the specimen until a pathology report is received. Click here to view full specimen details.
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  • Melanocytic tumors arising in the skin can present a significant diagnostic challenge.
  • Many lesions can be easily classified as benign nevi or malignant melanoma based on histologic features alone, however, there is a significant subset that cannot be clearly defined.
  • This fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based test panel has been developed as a diagnostic aid in the differentiation of malignant from benign melanocytic lesions.
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  • Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH)
  • The assay developed at Mayo Clinic uses 3 commercially available probes sets that identify abnormalities on chromosomes that are particularly sensitive and specific for melanoma cells.

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  • Day(s) and Time(s) Test Performed: Monday through Friday; 6 a.m.-9 p.m., Saturday and Sunday 6 a.m.-4 p.m.
  • Test reported Monday through Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
  • Analytic Time: 7 days
This entry was posted in Melanoma, Oncology, Skin Cancer, Test in Focus, Testing.

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