PathWays Case Study: October 27

The decedent is a 72-year-old Caucasian woman from the Midwest with an 18-month history of progressive hepatic failure. Before hospitalization, she was dependent on nasojejunal tube feeds and fortnightly paracenteses. While in her home, she fell and suffered a left periprosthetic hip fracture. She was admitted to the hospital. Subsequently, she developed bilateral deep vein thromboses. Intravenous heparin therapy was initiated but had to be discontinued because of hematochezia. In addition, the patient could no longer tolerate her tube feedings or medical management of hepatic failure. She subsequently died in the hospital. At autopsy, she had an 860 g micronodular liver (expected, 472 – 1072 g) with intracellular pigment in hepatocytes and exocrine pancreatic cells (Figures 1 & 2).

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Justin Juskewitch, M.D., Ph.D.

Justin Juskewitch, M.D., Ph.D.
Resident, Division of Anatomic and Clinical Pathology
Mayo Clinic

 

 

 

Michael Torbenson, M.D.

Michael Torbenson, M.D.
Consultant, Division of Anatomic Pathology
Mayo Clinic
Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology,
Mayo Clinic College of Medicine

 

 

Anja Roden, M.D.

Anja Roden, M.D.
Consultant, Division of Anatomic Pathology
Mayo Clinic
Associate Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology,
Mayo Clinic College of Medicine

apriljosselyn

April Josselyn

April Josselyn is a Marketing Associate at Mayo Medical Laboratories. She is the editor of Mayo Clinic PathWays and supports corporate communications strategies and internal communications. She has worked at Mayo Clinic since 2012. Outside of work, April enjoys the outdoors and being "hockey mom" for her two sports-crazed boys.

Responses

could you illustrate other pigments deposition in a further post? and illustrate differences between deposition in hepatocytes and Kuppfer cells
again congratulations for the case

Very well written. I learned a lot from this case study.

very good

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