November 1962: Widening the Scope of Work in Microbiology #ThrowbackThursday

In the early 1960s, the Virology and Immunology Laboratories of the Section of Microbiology were established when Dr. E. C. Herrmann and Dr. Harold Markowitz joined the staff. Remodeling and extension of the Microbiology Section on third floor, Plummer Building, were undertaken to provide facilities for the two laboratories. Check out the photos below to see various areas of the laboratories.

Glassware preparation and general laboratory area of the Virology Laboratory. Technician Carol Schreiner is at autoclave which also opens at the opposite side into the “sterile” area.
Glassware preparation and general laboratory area of the Virology Laboratory. Technician Carol Schreiner is at autoclave which also opens at the opposite side into the “sterile” area.
Left: Technician Cynthia Mathias places a tray of embryonated eggs inoculated with virus in the incubator. Temperature is maintained at 98 degrees F. Tissue cultures and eggs remain here for upwards of ten days and are then examined for evidence of virus-caused pathology. Technicians in the Virology Laboratory in addition to Miss Schreiner and Miss Mathias are Louise Reichrath, Helen Vitek and Kathleen Schlough. Dr. William Rawls, fellow in medicine, is assigned to the laboratory on a research project.
Left: Technician Cynthia Mathias places a tray of embryonated eggs inoculated with virus in the incubator. Temperature is maintained at 98 degrees F. Tissue cultures and eggs remain here for upwards of ten days and are then examined for evidence of virus-caused pathology. Technicians in the Virology Laboratory in addition to Miss Schreiner and Miss Mathias are Louise Reichrath, Helen Vitek and Kathleen Schlough. Dr. William Rawls, fellow in medicine, is assigned to the laboratory on a research project.
Left: Dr. Markowitz with automatic recording unit and fraction collector used in the fractionation apparatus in the Immunology Laboratory. Right: Part of the chromatographic apparatus used in the fractionation of Histoplasma capsulatum antigens.
Left: Dr. Markowitz with automatic recording unit and fraction collector used in the fractionation apparatus in the Immunology Laboratory.
Right: Part of the chromatographic apparatus used in the fractionation of Histoplasma capsulatum antigens.
Mrs. Darrell Henderson examines a 2 gallon batch of Histoplasma capsulatum growing in an incubator-shaker. All flasks are capped and the shaker can be completely sealed as an additional safeguard. Organisms grow for 20 days at constant temperature with agitation before they are harvested.
Mrs. Darrell Henderson examines a 2 gallon batch of Histoplasma capsulatum growing in an incubator-shaker. All flasks are capped and the shaker can be completely sealed as an additional safeguard. Organisms grow for 20 days at constant temperature with agitation before they are harvested.
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Alyssa Frank

Alyssa Frank is a Marketing Associate at Mayo Medical Laboratories. She supports marketing strategies for product management and specialty testing. Alyssa has worked at Mayo Clinic since 2015.