July 1967: Gastroenterology Unit Moves to New Wing at Saint Marys

In July 1967, the Mayo Clinic Gastroenterology Unit moved to an area on the second floor in Saint Marys Alfred Unit. The new location provided vastly enlarged and improved facilities.

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In one of the main biochemistry laboratories, Drs. A. F. Hofman and W. H. J. Summerskill examine a new liquid gas chromatograph. The device is used for a variety of quantitative determinations of substances such as bile acids.

The photographs below give only a partial view of the unit, which occupied nearly 7,000 square feet of the second floor area. It provided:

  • A patient study area with four beds for patients undergoing “acute” studies, of one to four hours’ duration.
  • Laboratories with a full range of biochemical facilities and a high degree of versatility. Among these were a cold room for enzyme studies and a constant temperature room. Isotope facilities included counters and read-out equipment for determination of uptake and excretion of radioactive substances.
  • An X-ray facility, which provided fluoroscope with image intensification, cineradiography, and television monitoring.
  • Offices for staff, patient examining room, consultation rooms, secretarial area, and conference rooms.
  • A library-conference room for the unit’s teaching program.
Desk attendants Lora Hessig and Linda Grimes demonstrate.
Desk attendants Lora Hessig and Linda Grimes demonstrate.
The patient study area provides facilities for “acute” studies (of one to four hours’ duration) in normal subjects and in out-patients or patients housed elsewhere in the hospital. Technician Fay Thorsell is in the role of subject in this photograph, with Dr. V. L. W. Go, resident in gastroenterology, and nurse supervisor Betty Lee Stubbs. Such a study might involve intubation of the gastrointestinal tract to study the electrical potential difference across the mucosa.
The patient study area provides facilities for “acute” studies (of one to four hours’ duration) in normal subjects and in out-patients or patients housed elsewhere in the hospital. Technician Fay Thorsell is in the role of subject in this photograph, with Dr. V. L. W. Go, resident in Gastroenterology, and nurse supervisor Betty Lee Stubbs. Such a study might involve intubation of the gastrointestinal tract to study the electrical potential difference across the mucosa.
The x-ray room in the unit is equipped with an image intensifier, cineradiograph and television monitoring. Dale Mulholland is x-ray technician assigned full time to the unit. In the role of patient is laboratory technician Carol McNallan. An example of use of this facility is a study involving a recording of blood flow and pressures in the liver. This is a four-hour study during which recording of cardiac output, the ECG and arterial and hepatic venous blood pressures is carried out. Blood pressure within the liver is measured by a strain gauge attached to an open tipped tube which is positioned within the liver. Positioning of the tube can be visualized on the TV screen during the procedure.
The X-ray room in the unit is equipped with an image intensifier, cineradiograph, and television monitoring. Dale Mulholland is the X-ray technician assigned full time to the unit. In the role of patient is laboratory technician Carol McNallan. An example of use of this facility is a study involving a recording of blood flow and pressures in the liver. This is a four-hour study during which recording of cardiac output, the ECG, and arterial and hepatic venous blood pressures are carried out. Blood pressure within the liver is measured by a strain gauge attached to an open-tipped tube, which is positioned within the liver. Positioning of the tube can be visualized on the TV screen during the procedure.
Dr. S. Oshiba from Japan, research assistant on a one-year appointment to the unit, follows results of determinations on bile from hamsters which are carried out on a liquid gas chromatograph.
Dr. S. Oshiba from Japan, research assistant on a one-year appointment to the unit, follows results of determinations on bile from hamsters, which are carried out on a liquid gas chromatograph.
The secretaries’ office looks onto the main corridor of the unit, as well as a small waiting area adjacent to the elevators. Secretaries are Mary Olness and Carole Ries.
The secretaries’ office looks onto the main corridor of the unit, as well as a small waiting area adjacent to the elevators. Secretaries are Mary Olness and Carole Ries.
The library-conference room is focal point of the unit’s education program. From left are Dr. Gerald Bevan, Dr. Summerskill, Dr. Phillips and Dr. G. Devroede. Daily conferences for staff and residents are held here.
The library-conference room is a focal point of the unit’s education program. From left are Drs. Gerald Bevan,  Summerskill, Phillips, and G. Devroede. Daily conferences for staff and residents are held here.

 

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Alyssa Frank

Alyssa Frank is a Marketing Associate at Mayo Medical Laboratories. She supports marketing strategies for product management and specialty testing. Alyssa has worked at Mayo Clinic since 2015.